Industry References

Machine Design: Whats the difference between torque control solutions?

Here's a breakdown of the various clutches and brakes used to control production speed - a crucial factor in virtually any industrial setting. Electric clutches may not be always the engineer's first choice when looking at torque-control solutions. Electric motor drive systems, pneumatic clutches, or even friction spring types are thought of first, but certain unique styles of electromagnetic clutches lend themselves very well to tension and torque control. They basically fall into two categories: powered and non-powered.
Click Here for Full Article

Design World: Trends in Clutches and Brakes

TRENDS in clutches and brakes leverage software and customization. Clutches and brakes hold, stop, or index loads in motion designs. Especially over the last five years, a trend towards application-specific components has quickened as several industries push the performance envelope of stock parts. So, we asked industry experts about this and other trends spurring clutch and brake innovation. The biggest growth in industrial clutch and brake use is for power-off brakes, because production automation-steadily rising-requires many holding brakes.
Click Here for Full Article

Motion System Design: Ogura Electromagnetic Particle Clutch Produces Tensioning in Winding

Most wire manufacturers have applications for which magnetic particle clutches and brakes are suitable. Consider how a plant might control the rewind tension when transferring wire from one large roll to smaller rolls: as wire is rewound onto the smaller rolls, a dancer arm measures the diameter of wire applied.
Click Here for Full Article

Machine Design: The Basics of Electromagnetic Clutches and Brakes

On July 9th, Machine Design published an article written by Ogura on considerations that design engineers should follow when designing in electromagnetic clutches and brakes. The original article that was submitted is attached as well as the link to the article in Machine Design. http://www.machinedesign.com/archive/basics-electromagnetic-clutches-and-brakes
Click Here for Full Article

Machine Design: Getting a Handle on Inertia UPDATE

There is a typo in the low speed formula. The reflected inertia of LG1 is currently listed as JLG1/(NS2/NL1)2. The correct formula should be JLG1/(NL1/NS2)2. In the high speed operation the reflected inertia of large gear 2 and small gear 1 is repeated twice. JLG2 + (JLG1/(NL1/NS2)2) should be eliminated from the first half of the equation. These mistakes were caught by Neal Middleberg, who is the Chief Engineer of Bowe Bell and Howell, who uses this type of formula to help define total system inertia in complex machines.
Click Here for Full Article

Machine Design: Getting a Grip on Clutch and Brake Selection

Ogura Industrial was featured in the September issue of Machine Design. The featured article, entitled "Getting A Grip On Clutch And Brake Selection", detailed the proper steps that should be taken when selecting an electromechanical clutch or brake. The article also highlighted the importance of inertia when selecting a clutch and brake and the free inertia calculator on our web site was highlighted.
Click Here for Full Article

Floating armature revs up clutch/brake system

Early in the design of Pitney Bowes' 14 Series high-speed insertion machine, engineers realized in order to provide customers with higher throughput than ever before possible--14,000 documents an hour--they faced a real challenge. They would need a clutch/brake solution that could perform significantly better than conventional electromagnetic technology. Utilities, banks, and other companies use these machines to fold, insert, and apply postage to customer statements. To put things into perspective, Pitney Bowes' new machine had to handle nearly four sheets of paper per sec. But after factoring in the time for a sheet of paper to physically move between three buffer stations within the machine, the clutch had a mere 25 ms to respond. In
Click Here for Full Article

Brakes and clutches adapt to users needs

Design engineers like yourself use clutches and brakes to solve a myriad of real-world problems. Today's clutches and brakes, often supplemented by control electronics, offer performance unavailable to engineers only a decade ago. No more drift. Working with application engineers from Warner Electric Corp., engineers Gary Marsh and Mike Buttrill of BAE Inc., Dallas, TX, put together a closed-loop control system that automatically compensates for clutch/brake drift in the baggage-handling conveyor system at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW).
Click Here for Full Article

Ten ways to ruin an electric clutch or brake

Mostly, electric clutches and brakes run for hundreds of thousands of cycles with little watching. Overlook a few of their basic needs, however, and these normally unassuming devices can suddenly protest JAMES D. KLANN of Stearns Div. JUN 01, 2000 Though clutches and brakes differ in purpose and application, for troubleshooting and problem-solving purposes their operating principles are similar. We focus here on positive-action units that are either electrically or mechanically actuated (“spring-set”), which includes brakes with On-Off action and Start-Stop clutches. Most problems in the field show up as overheating, torque loss, or coil failure. Unless you dig until you find the culprit, you’ll probably keep replacing
Click Here for Full Article

Choosing electric clutches & brakes to meet thermal capacity needs

Internal rather than external heat in clutches and brakes is the usual culprit, because few applications operate in ambient temperatures high enough to cause fade, slippage, and loss of braking efficiency. The heat that causes these symptoms is usually generated when the device operates in a fast-cycling application or with too high an inertial load. When faced with conditions beyond normal range in these areas, the power-transmission system designer must use extra care in product selection and application. The clutch and brake electromagnets (coils) also contribute to the total heat the product experiences, but it is usually small compared with the heat of friction in starting or stopping an inertial load.
Click Here for Full Article

Softstart controller

A Softstart control option for gas and diesel engines, as well as for clutches on electric motors, senses the exact point at which friction surfaces contact and then rapidly reduces the current to a level that lets the clutch safely slip, but not release. Using engine rpm feedback, the controller adjusts the clutch current that drives the engine rpm to fit a desired profile. A Softstart control option for gas and diesel engines, as well as for clutches on electric motors, senses the exact point at which friction surfaces contact and then rapidly reduces the current to a level that lets the clutch safely slip, but not release. Using engine rpm feedback, the controller adjusts the clutch current that drives the engine rpm to fit a desired
Click Here for Full Article

10 tips for safely using brakes and clutches

Choosing the best brake or clutch for the job takes technical know-how and savvy selection skills. Follow these expert tips to get your next application off to a good start - and stop. One of the most important — and most overlooked — steps in selecting the appropriate brake for a drive system is considering the system's total inertia. Frank Flemming A standard electric motor brake usually can stop the driven load as often as the motor can safely start it. However, in more demanding applications, such as those with high inertial loads, frequent cycling, and where short stopping times are important, total system inertia should be calculated to accurately determine the brake's requirements and suitability.
Click Here for Full Article

Using slip clutches in industrial design

Continuous and intermittent slip clutches nd myriad uses, and engineers improve new motion control applications with them every day. How do they work? Torque is transmitted from ats on a clutch hub to mating ats on inner plates (through friction pads) and then to outer plates through torque pins, to the housing and an output gear or pulley. Torque level is controlled by compressing springs with an adjusting nut. For a xed-torque clutch, a collar is attached to the hub in a xed position instead of to the adjusting nut. In operation, either the input shaft or the housing can act as input member, with the other member being driven. Continuous slip clutches can provide long life in a broad range of applications, and at a cost advantage co
Click Here for Full Article

Electromagnetic brakes and clutches

Clutches and brakes with an electromagnetic interface offer definite advantages, including accurate engaging and clean releasing. Besides being quick, they also run cooler and cleaner, with the convenience and controllability of electrical components. Here we take a look at the four general friction and non-friction types, how they work, and when they’re most appropriate. Magnetic particle Motionsystemdesign Com Images Magnetic Particle Clutch 200 602 In magnetic particle brakes, an output disc (attached to the output shaft) sits untouched inside a housing. Remaining empty space within the housing is filled with magnetic shavings or powder that remains free-flowing until acted on by a magnetic field radiating from a stationary coil
Click Here for Full Article

Applying fail-safe brakes to stop and hold

A fail-safe brake automatically stops a drive when electrical power fails. Some are best suited for static holding, others for on-off cycling. Here’s how the basic types work, and tips for selection. The term fail-safe brake refers to a type of brake that engages to prevent shaft rotation when electrical power is removed for any reason. When power is restored, the brake releases and stays in the off position. Like all friction clutches and brakes, fail-safe brakes generate torque through friction surfaces that are clamped together. The source of the clamping force distinguishes the two basic types — permanent magnet and spring-set.
Click Here for Full Article

Clutches, brakes, and inertia

The optimal size for a clutch or brake is determined by three things: Required torque, thermal horsepower per engagement, and average required thermal The optimal size for a clutch or brake is determined by three things: Required torque, thermal horsepower per engagement, and average required thermal horsepower. Here, we'll discuss the first, learning to calculate torque capacity under static and dynamic conditions. Dynamic torque To accurately determine the torque required during acceleration or deceleration, it is necessary to know total inertia, component efficiency, total load torque, and the amounts reflected back to the clutch/brake output shaft. A major consideration is inefficiencies; individual drive components and their p
Click Here for Full Article

Brakes and clutches: Top trends in IoT — and uses on ac-motor conveyors and servodesigns

Clutches and brakes work in motion systems to stop or hold or index axes — but must do so to application specifications. No wonder then that the trend in this technology is away strictly stock parts. According to Lesli Riehemann, president at Mach III Clutch Inc., customized brakes and clutches are now 75 to 80% of her company’s annual production. What’s more, an increasing number of clutch and brake manufacturers are now looking to supply non-catalog products — and so customization has become normalized. In fact, industrial brakes and clutches could become a $1.7 billion market by 2024, mostly due to investment in industrial automation and the rise of smart factories. That’s according to Global Industry Analysts Inc. (GIA). Th
Click Here for Full Article

Brakes and clutches: Top trends in IoT — and uses on ac-motor conveyors and servodesigns

Clutches and brakes work in motion systems to stop or hold or index axes — but must do so to application specifications. No wonder then that the trend in this technology is away strictly stock parts. According to Lesli Riehemann, president at Mach III Clutch Inc., customized brakes and clutches are now 75 to 80% of her company’s annual production. What’s more, an increasing number of clutch and brake manufacturers are now looking to supply non-catalog products — and so customization has become normalized. In fact, industrial brakes and clutches could become a $1.7 billion market by 2024, mostly due to investment in industrial automation and the rise of smart factories. That’s according to Global Industry Analysts Inc. (GIA). Th
Click Here for Full Article